Europe’s Most Beautiful Railway Stations.

What is Europe’s most beautiful railway station? Which European city has the most stunning railway stations? Why did they choose these particular locations? Today, rail travel remains an important means of transport around the globe. For example, in 2016, almost 4 million travellers chose to take the train to get from Paris to Venice. In addition, trains also play a vital role in connecting cities across Europe. There are over 3,500 kilometers (2,200 miles) of tracks throughout the continent.

Railway stations are often considered landmarks. They provide travellers with rest stops, shopping opportunities, and even sightseeing experiences. Some of them remain untouched for decades or longer, providing memories for generations of passengers. These are some of the most beautiful railway stations in the world.

Prague Castle Station, Czech Republic

This station, located at the heart of Prague, lies within the grounds of the Prague Castle complex. This station was designed by Otto Wagner, who was one of the leading architects of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. Hence it is known as the “Gateway to Bohemia” due to its historical significance. It was here that the Hapsburg emperor Ferdinand I officially signed a treaty establishing the independence of Bohemia and Moravia from Austria on October 28, 1742. The main hall is 60 meters long and 25 meters wide. Its spacious interior design provides space for shops, restaurants and entertainment venues.

Saint Pancras International Station, London, UK                                                Europe’s Most Beautiful Railway Stations.

This impressive Victorian Gothic structure was completed in 1868. The architect behind the project was George Townsend Andrews. The original idea for the station came from Sir William Tite, who died before seeing his plans come to life. He never saw what became of it because he died of an overdose of chloroform. The railway company knew they needed something spectacular if they wanted more passengers to use their service. They turned to George Townsend Andrews, who had been responsible for many other railway stations around England.

Today, this is still one of London’s major commuter hubs. Trains leave every few minutes during rush hour and there are links to all parts of the capital and beyond. Travel time between King’s Cross and Waterloo takes just under 30 minutes.

Gare du Nord, Paris, France

When you enter the station, you have access to two large halls: the Grand Hall and the Petit Hall. The Grand Hall contains retail outlets while the Petit Hall offers fast food options. On either side of the platforms, there are public rooms where people can buy tickets, catch up on newspapers, and magazines, listen to music or enjoy free Wi-Fi internet connections.

Istanbul Atatürk Airport – Turkey

Istanbul Atatürk Airport is located in Turkey and serves as a primary airport for the Turkish capital. Many high-speed trains serve the station including the famous Orient Express. Passengers have direct access to the terminal through a tunnel. Atatürk Airport opened on November 11, 1934. After years of construction, the total cost was approximately $25,000,000.

Amsterdam Central Station – Netherlands

This station is one of the biggest railway stations in the Netherlands. Construction of the railway station began in 1896 and continued for over 100 years. A fire burned down the building in 1936. The current station building cost about $38,000,000 in 2007. From there you can catch many Euro star International Trains to London, Brussels, Cologne, Madrid and elsewhere.

Budapest Keleti Station – Hungary

The first Keleti station opened in 1915 and closed down in 1996 due to structural problems. The rebuilt building was opened in 2003 to serve the growing number of people who were traveling internationally and wanted to switch from domestic flights to international ones. This station is one of Budapest’s biggest tourist attractions. One can enter the station through the large Grand Avenue mall, named after Grand Boulevard, and walk straight up to ticket counters, shops, restaurants and cafes.

Zurich – Switzerland

Zurich HB is part of the Swiss Rail network. The main railway station was constructed in several stages. The first opening was in 1862. By 1890 the main platform had already been constructed. On the eastern side, the Kaiser Bridge (Kaiserbrücke) spans the Limmat River. In 1951 the Swiss Federal Railways bought the northern track from SBB and the southern track from ZVV. Thus, the two stations were connected under one roof. Between 1962 and 1965 the east wing was added. This wing included additional tracks and platforms.

In conclusion , if we have left out any major European train station please feel free to add them. We will be adding more travel guides regarding European rails and online casino games soon! So stay tuned!